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DPM Podcast

Controlling (Scope) Creeps (with Suze Haworth)

By 29/10/2018August 3rd, 2020 No Comments

This podcast is part of an article published on The Digital Project Manager.
You can read the article here.

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Audio Transcription:

Ben Aston:

Welcome to the DPM podcast where we go beyond theory to give expert advice for leading better digital projects. Thanks for tuning in. I’m Ben Aston, founder of the Digital Project Manager. Now, if there’s one thing that derails almost every project, it’s scope creep. We all know it’s bad. We all know we want to avoid it. But how do you know it in all its various guises? What causes it? Whose fault it is? And most importantly, how do you actually deal with it? All will be revealed in today’s podcast, where we’re talking about controlling creeps of the project scope variety.

This podcast is brought to you by Clarizen, the leader in enterprise projects and project management software.

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I’m with Suze Hayworth today. Suze is one of our resident DPM experts at the Digital Project Manager, and she works as a freelance senior Digital Project Manager in London in the UK. She’s got more than 10 years experience working in agencies, and she’s experienced a lot of scope creep, so she’s a great person to be talking with us today. Suze, welcome.

Suze Hayworth:

Hi, Ben.

Ben Aston:

So Suze, we were just chatting before we started recording. Can you tell us a bit about the kind of projects you’re working on at the moment, and you know, some of the challenges that you’re facing?

Suze Hayworth:

Yes, so I’m currently working at an agency in London freelancing, so I’m sort of split between a senior project manager and project director role across two accounts. So, one of them I’m working for IKEA, so sort of large retail, ecommerce company. And we’re doing a design system for them, sort of prototype design system. And then I’m working on also … , another ecommerce retailer in the UK. So, a lot of retail projects at the moment. Yeah and challenges, I guess, it’s always hard to talk about the challenges … especially when they’re alive. Yeah, I think-

Ben Aston:

Is it that pesky client?

Suze Hayworth:

Yeah. No, actually. They’re really, I have to say this anyway.

Ben Aston:

You do.

Suze Hayworth:

That’s true. It’s true. They’re very good clients I’m working with at the moment. I think it’s, I mean this is the sort of good and bad thing about projects and being a project manager in general, is just working with people. So it’s great. I love working with people, different characters, and quirks, and that. But also, you do sometimes get to a point where you get a bit frustrated with struggling to try and get stuff out of people who don’t want to do stuff and things like that. So yeah, I’ve had a bit of that recently, I think.

Ben Aston:

Fun and games. So well, tell us about the project to build a design system because I think that’s an interesting project, and actually it’s the kind of project that we’re seeing more of. Whereas previously perhaps, everyone liked to treat every kind of project as a special snowflake, and you know, the creatives wants to be creative. So talk us through, what is a design system? And how do you … Like what is the project that you’re actually working on? And how is it … How are you kind of rolling that out?

Ben Aston

Ben Aston

I’m Ben Aston, a digital project manager and founder of thedigitalprojectmanager.com. I've been in the industry for more than 15 years working in the UK at London’s top digital agencies including Dare, Wunderman, Lowe and DDB. I’ve delivered everything from film to CMS', games to advertising and eCRM to eCommerce sites. I’ve been fortunate enough to work across a wide range of great clients; automotive brands including Land Rover, Volkswagen and Honda; Utility brands including BT, British Gas and Exxon, FMCG brands such as Unilever, and consumer electronics brands including Sony.

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