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Quickly summarize all of your key project info in this Project Charter template: lock in your scope, deliverables, assumptions, budget, key dependencies, team members, communication plan, timeline, and more.

A screenshot of The Digital Project Manager's project charter template.
A project charter is a formal document that outlines the shared understanding of a project’s scope, development, and project objectives, while also defining the roles and responsibilities of each party involved.

Project Charter Overview

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Project Charter Guide

What Is A Project Charter Used For?

A project charter is a formal document that captures and communicates the shared understanding of a project’s scope, development, and project objectives, while also defining the roles and responsibilities of each party involved.

It is used to drive alignment on key project details, to socialize those details to project stakeholders, and to formally authorize the project into existence — including the authority of the project manager to commandeer resources to achieve the project goals.

How To Create A Project Charter

There’s no single right way to create a project management charter, but here is a basic process you could consider:

  1. Discuss the project details with your stakeholders and your team
  2. Build consensus around any key areas where opinions differ
  3. Compile and organize your notes
  4. Decide on a template or structure for your charter
  5. Include specific project information
  6. Review with team representatives
  7. Present it for approval

Author’s Tip

The primary reasons to have a project charter are to drive alignment on key project details and to get authorization for your project to come into existence. If you’re not achieving those two goals with your charter, you might not need a charter at all!

Project Charter FAQs